2ND SCREENING OF 'INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS' ADDED! - DECEMBER 12

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013
Posted by Jim Healy

UW CINEMATHEQUE ADDS 2ND PRE-RELEASE SCREENING OF JOEL AND ETHAN COEN’S ‘INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS’

DECEMBER 8 & DECEMBER 12 SCREENINGS OF NEW FILM ABOUT 60S NYC FOLK MUSIC SCENE WILL BE SHOWN ON 35MM

The UW Cinematheque has added a second special free preview screening of the new film Inside Llewyn Davis. In addition to the already announced screening on Sunday, December 8 at 7 p.m., a second screening will take place Thursday, December 12 at 7 p.m.. Both screenings will take place in the Cinematheque’s regular venue, 4070 Vilas Hall, 821 University Avenue.

Inside Llewyn Davis, the new film from Academy Award-winners Joel and Ethan Coen, follows a week in the life of a young folk singer at a crossroads, struggling to make it in the Greenwich Village folk scene of 1961. Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac)—guitar in tow, huddled against the unforgiving New York winter—is beset by seemingly insurmountable obstacles, some of them of his own making. Living at the mercy of both friends and strangers, scaring up what work he can find, Llewyn journeys from the baskethouses of the Village to an empty Chicago club—on a misbegotten odyssey to audition for a music mogul—and back again. Starring Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan, Justin Timberlake, John Goodman, and Garrett Hedlund,

No passes required. Seating is limited and provided on a first-come, first-seated basis. Doors open at 6:15 p.m. We anticipate a full-house. Please arrive early!

A 35mm print will be shown

What and Where:

A screening of Inside Llewyn Davis.

Sunday, December 8, 7 p.m.

AND

Thursday, December 12, 7 p.m.

at:

UW Cinematheque
4070 Vilas Hall
821 University Avenue
Madison, WI 53706

Admission free. Seating limited.

Cinematheque website: http://cinema.wisc.edu

INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS
USA | 2013 | 35mm | 106 min.
Director: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Cast: Oscar Isaac, Justin Timberlake, Carey Mulligan

See you at the Movies!

Jim Healy, Director of Programming

A GIRL IN EVERY PORT: THE BIRTH OF LULU?

Monday, December 2nd, 2013
Posted by Jim Healy

Program Notes by Thomas Gladysz

Howard Hawks' A Girl in Every Port is a well-crafted and entertaining "buddy film" widely considered the director's best silent. It's also a film with a special legacy.

A Girl in Every Port features a romantic triangle – a reoccurring motif in many of Hawks' later works. It tells the story of two sailors (Victor McLaglen and Robert Armstrong) and their adventures in various ports of call around the world. Louise Brooks plays Marie (Mam'selle Godiva), a high diver and sideshow siren and the love interest of both sailors. Other girls in other ports of call include Myrna Loy, Sally Rand, Leila Hyams, and Maria Casajuana (the future Maria Alba).

Released by Fox in February of 1928, A Girl in Every Port debuted at the 6,000 seat Roxy Theater in New York City. For days on end, the film played to a packed house. Ads placed by the studio in trade publications claimed it set a "New House Record – and a World Record – with Daily Receipts on February 22 of $29,463." Considering ticket prices of the time, that's a lot of money.

Popular as well as critically acclaimed, the film received good reviews in New York's daily newspapers. The New York Times described it "A rollicking comedy," while the New York Telegram called it "a hit picture." The Morning Telegraph pronounced it a "winner."

The Daily News noted, "Director Howard Hawks has injected several devilish touches in the piece, which surprisingly enough, got by the censors. His treatment of the snappy scenario is smooth and at all times interesting. Victor's great, Armstrong's certainly appreciable, and Louise Brooks is at her loveliest."

Reviewing the premiere, TIME magazine stated, "There are two rollicking sailors in this fractious and excellent comedy. . . . A Girl in Every Port is really What Price Glory? translated from arid and terrestrial irony to marine gaiety of the most salty and miscellaneous nature. Nobody could be more charming than Louise Brooks, that clinging and tender little barnacle from the docks of Marseilles. Director Howard Hawks and his entire cast, especially Robert Armstrong, deserve bouquets and kudos."

A number of critics singled out Brooks. The New York American stated, “Then comes THE woman. She is Louise Brooks, pert, fascinating young creature, who does high and fancy diving for a living. . . . Miss Brooks 'takes' our hero in somewhat the manner that Grant took Richmond. . . . Louise Brooks has a way of making a junior vamp and infantile scarlet lady seem most attractive."

A reviewer for the English Kinematograph Weekly echoed American reviews of the film, and picked up on the film's somewhat different bromance. "Louise Brooks made a charmingly heartless vamp. . . . It has the novelty of a love interest that does not materialize, which is replaced by the friendship between two men."

The film made a bigger splash in France. Writing in 1930 in his "Paris Cinema Chatter" column in the New York Times, Morris Gilbert noted ". . . there are a number of others – mostly American – which have their place as 'classics' in the opinion of the French. . . . They love A Girl in Every Port, which has the added distinction of being practically the only American film which keeps its own English title here." The film enjoyed an extended run in the French capitol, and lingered for decades in the French consciousness.

Writing in Cahiers du Cinéma in 1963, French film archivist Henri Langlois stated, "It seems that A Girl in Every Port was the revelation of the Hawks season at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. For New York audiences of 1962, Louise Brooks suddenly acquired that 'Face of the century' aura she had had, many years ago, for spectators at the Cinema des Ursulines. . . . That is why Blaise Cendrars confided a few years ago that he thought A Girl in Every Port definitely marked the first appearance of contemporary cinema. To the Paris of 1928, which was rejecting expressionism, A Girl in Every Port was a film conceived in the present, achieving an identity of its own by repudiating the past."

Brooks, under contract to Paramount, was loaned to Fox for her role in A Girl in Every Port. Anticipating the female types cast by Hawks in later works, the bobbed-hair actress stands as what might well be the first "Hawksian woman." Years later, the director stated, "I wanted a different type of girl. I hired Louise because she's very sure of herself, she's very analytical, she's very feminine, but she's damn good and sure she's going to do what she wants to do."

Film histories note that A Girl in Every Port ranks as the most significant of Hawks' silent films; additionally, historians claim, it seemingly persuaded G.W. Pabst to cast Louise Brooks in Pandora's Box. Such a claim was likely first made by James Card of the George Eastman House in his 1956 article, "Out of Pandora's Box: Louise Brooks on G. W. Pabst." It was repeated by others, including Brooks herself, in filmed interviews in the 1970's.

In Germany, Pabst came to cast Brooks as Lulu only after a well publicized nationwide search which concluded months after A Girl in Every Port premiered in New York City. Not quite content with a German actress (including, legend has it, Marlene Dietrich), Pabst wrote to Paramount asking after Brooks, then an American starlet. The German director was also in search of a "different type."

Chronologically, the assumption that Pabst saw his Lulu in Hawks' Marie makes sense – Brooks plays a temptress in both films. Records show, however, that Blaue jungens, blonde Madchen (the German title for Hawk's film) was not shown in Germany until December, after production on Pandora's Box was finished.

Could Pabst have seen A Girl in Every Port well prior to its release in Germany? Or, might Pabst have noticed Brooks in one of her earlier American films, like Die Braut am Scheidewege (Just Another Blonde) or Ein Frack Ein Claque Ein Madel (Evening Clothes)? Each were shown in Berlin while Pabst was looking for Lulu, and each received press which highlighted Brooks.

Whatever the answer to this small mystery, A Girl in Every Port remains an entertaining film worthy of greater recognition – not only because it stars Louise Brooks, and not only because it may or may not have led Pabst to cast the actress as Lulu in Pandora's Box.

It's deserving because it is an early work by great director which introduces the themes and characters Hawks would continue to explore throughout his long and distinguished career.

Thomas Gladysz is an arts journalist, silent film enthusiast, and the founding director of the Louise Brooks Society, an online archive and international fan club devoted to the film star. Gladysz has curated exhibits, contributed to books, appeared on television, and introduced the actress's films around the world.

Just added! NEW FACES OF INDEPENDENT FILM program

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013
Posted by Jim Healy
New Faces

CINEMATHEQUE PRESS RELEASE -- FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 13, 2013


CINEMATHEQUE PRESENTS “NEW FACES OF INDEPENDENT FILM”
3 SHORT FILM DIRECTORS TO APPEAR IN PERSON ON NOV. 16

On Saturday, November 16 at 3 p.m., the UW Cinematheque welcomes three filmmakers who appeared on Filmmaker Magazine’s prestigious “25 New Faces of Independent Film.”  Anahita Ghazvinizadeh, Scott Blake and Mohammad Gorjestani will each present the short film that landed them on the list, and participate in a discussion afterwards with Filmmaker Managing Editor Nick Dawson. 
The screening will take place at the UW Cinematheque, at 4045 Vilas Hall, 821 University Ave. This Cinematheque Screening is free and open to the public.   Please see below for a complete description of this special program.

Event Synopsis:

Since 1998, Filmmaker Magazine has put out an annual talent list, its "25 New Faces of Independent Film," which has acted for a barometer for American indie cinema, bringing early attention to such talents as Hilary Swank, Ryan Gosling, Lena Dunham and Miranda July, among many others. This fall, three directors selected for the 2013 list -- Anahita Ghazvinizadeh, Scott Blake and Mohammad Gorjestani -- hit the road with their work, accompanied by Filmmaker's Managing Editor Nick Dawson (author of Being Hal Ashby: Life of a Hollywood Rebel). Following the screening of the trio's short films, there will be a Q&A discussing both the movies being shown and the legacy of the "25 New Faces" list.

Short Film Details:

Needle
Anahita Ghazvinizadeh / USA, 2013 / 21 mins
Young Lilly is going to get her ears pierced. A quarrel between her parents overwhelms the situation and directs it differently.  Winner, Cinefondation Prize, 2013 Cannes Film Festival.

Refuge
Mohammad Gorjestani / USA, 2013 / 23 mins
Set in 2020, a brewing cyberwar between the US and Iran puts Sonia, a young Iranian refugee, at risk of deportation. Her only escape may come at a greater price than she’s willing to pay.

Surveyor
Scott Blake / USA, 2012 / 25 mins
1848. In the last days of the Mexican-American War, a government agent surveyor attempts to return home after surveying land on the Western frontier. His journey becomes a nightmarish trek through an American gothic landscape.

Filmmaker Magazine’s 25 New Faces of Independent Film will screen Saturday, November 16, 3 p.m. at:

UW Cinematheque
4070 Vilas Hall
821 University Ave.
Madison, WI 53706

Admission free. Seating limited.

Our website: http://cinema.wisc.edu


See you at the Movies!

Jim Healy, Director of Programming

AFTERNOON DELIGHT - Jill Soloway in person!

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013
Posted by Jim Healy
AFTERNOON DELIGHT

CINEMATHEQUE PRESS RELEASE -- FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 13, 2013


UW CINEMATHEQUE & WUD FILM COMMITTEE WELCOME JILL SOLOWAY TO CAMPUS FOR SCREENING OF HER FILM “AFTERNOON DELIGHT”
NOVEMBER 14 SCREENING AT UNION SOUTH WILL BE FOLLOWED BY PANEL DISCUSSION MODERATED BY THE WRITER-DIRECTOR AND UW MADISON ALUM

The UW Cinematheque, in collaboration with the Wisconsin Union Directorate Film Committee, will welcome award-winning writer and director Jill Soloway back to campus on November 14 for a screening of her feature-film debut, AFTERNOON DELIGHT. The 7 p.m. screening at the Marquee Theater in Union South will be immediately followed by a 30-minute panel discussion moderated by Jill Soloway that she has entitled “The Heroine’s Journey: How the Feminine is Expressed Through Cinematography, Feminism and Judaism in AFTERNOON DELIGHT.”
The story of AFTERNOON DELIGHT follows affluent wife and mother Rachel (Kathryn Hahn) who, after a chance meeting, finds herself irresistibly drawn into the messy personal life of young stripper McKenna (Juno Temple). When Rachel invites McKenna to move into her home, it unleashes a series of dramatic changes in Rachel’s life. With sharp observations on class and women’s roles in contemporary Los Angeles, the frequently funny, and wonderfully performed Afternoon Delight won Jill Soloway the Best Director prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival and has earned the admiration of critics and cineastes like Quentin Tarantino, who has listed the film as one of his ten favorite films of 2013 so far.

The post-screening panel will be moderated by Jill Soloway, who will discuss her work joined by Afternoon Delight’s Cinematographer Jim Frohna, as well as two UW, Madison professors: Tony Michels, the George L. Mosse Associate Professor of Jewish American History in the Department of History and Ellen Samuels, Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies and the Department of English.

A graduate of UW, Madison, Jill Soloway is a veteran television writer & producer who earned three Emmy nominations for her work on HBO’s SIX FEET UNDER. She was also Showrunner for HBO’s HOW TO MAKE IT IN AMERICA and Showtime’s UNITED STATES OF TARA. Before that, she authored the humorous feminist memoir TINY LADIES IN SHINY PANTS. In the land of theater, she created or co-created THE REAL LIVE BRADY BUNCH, MISS VAGINA PAGEANT and SIT N’ SPIN, a twice-monthly night of comedic monologues that’s been running for over a decade. The pilot of Jill Soloway’s original latest project, called TRANSPARENT will premiere on Amazon Prime in February, 2014.

What and Where:

A screening of AFTERNOON DELIGHT followed by a panel discussion moderated by writer-director Jill Soloway.

Thursday, November 14, 7 p.m. at:

Marquee Theater at Union South
1308 W. Dayton Street
Madison, WI 53715

Admission free for both screening and panel discussion. Seating limited.

Cinematheque website: http://cinema.wisc.edu

AFTERNOON DELIGHT
USA | 2013 | HD Projection | 90 min.
Director: Jill Soloway
Cast: Kathryn Hahn, Juno Temple, Josh Radnor, Jane Lynch
After a chance meeting, affluent wife and mother Rachel (Hahn) finds herself irresistibly drawn into the messy personal life of young stripper McKenna (Temple). When Rachel invites McKenna to move into her home, it unleashes a series of dramatic changes in Rachel’s life. With sharp observations on class and women’s roles in contemporary Los Angeles, the frequently funny, and wonderfully performed Afternoon Delight is the first feature film from Jill Soloway, a veteran television scribe and producer (Six Feet Under, The United States of Tara) and UW Madison alum. Soloway will join us in person to discuss her film, which won her the Best Director prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

See you at the Movies!

Jim Healy, Director of Programming

NOTES ON A VAMPIRE CLASSIC

Thursday, October 17th, 2013
Posted by Jim Healy
Klaus Kinski is Count Dracula in NOSFERATU: PHANTOM DER NACHT

The following notes on Werner Herzog's NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE were written by UW Madison student Ryan Waal (class of 2015). A screening of the restored, German version of NOSFERATU to benefit the Cinematheque and the Wisconsin Film Festival will occur on October 29. Tickets, $20 each, can be purchased in advance here: https://itkt.choicecrm.net/templates/UWFF/ or at the door (cash only) the night of the performance. Come in costume - door prizes!

What is it that makes a film scary? Horror films can employ any number of tricks to make their audience jump in their seat, scream or get a queasy feeling in their stomach. But while most films produce these responses through cheap jump scares or over-the-top violence, true masters of horror sustain their audience’s fear not through gimmicks, but through a general feeling of unease.

Enter Werner Herzog, whose 1979 horror film Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht is among the best films in the vampire genre I’ve seen, a picture which captures the full terror, absurdity and perverse humor of Bram Stoker’s classic Dracula story. Conceived as an homage to F.W. Murnau’s landmark 1922 silent film of the same name, this film is emotionally expressive and scary in ways most films only aspire to be, and a fantastic demonstration of Herzog’s abilities to curate and display pure weirdness on the screen. The film doesn’t try to be conventionally “scary,” but rather instills the viewer with pure dread.

The story, if you’re not familiar: Jonathan Harker (Bruno Ganz), a real estate agent from Wismar, Germany, is sent by his employer Reinfeld (Roland Topor) to close on a offer from the mysterious Count Dracula (the always disturbing Klaus Kinski). When he arrives, Dracula’s real intentions, involving the courtship of Jonathan’s wife Lucy (Isabelle Adjani) and the endless pursuit of human blood, become clearer.
This story has been done countless times cinematically, but previous Dracula movies haven’t the astonishing pictorial beauty that Herzog achieves. With his cinematographer Jörg Schmidt-Reitwein, Herzog shows a solemn, sad and harsh German countryside, with rich green hills enveloped by endless grey skies. The film hearkens back to techniques of German Expressionist artistry, most notably that of rückenfigur, in which human figures are displayed from behind looking out into the massive, overpowering environment. For a story that aims to portray the futility and weakness of humanity against dark, inhuman forces, Herzog’s visual style adequately conveys a kind of existential dread that any good horror film should strive to achieve.

One suspects that Murnau would’ve been proud of Herzog’s visual accomplishment, which incorporates nearly all of the filmic breakthroughs developed between the two films luxuriously. Besides the obvious inclusions of color and sound, Herzog incorporates mobile and handheld cameras to great effect; an early dinnertime confrontation between Jonathan and Dracula is perfectly realized with jittery camera movements that display the unease and paranoia of the situation. It also includes an absolutely majestic score by German band Popol Vuh, which emphasizes the scale of Jonathan’s journey and the ensuing terror he unleashes upon Wismar.

Complementing Herzog’s superb cinematic acumen is a cast which could not have been better calibrated for their roles. Ganz is an effective leading man and Adjani is hauntingly beautiful as his wife, a reservoir of fear and longing. Reinfeld, later revealed to be Dracula’s servant, is a character which requires an actor to luxuriate in madness, and Topor accomplishes this masterfully, creating a credibly mad human with his maniacal laugh and wild, bulging eyes.

But in the end, this really is Klaus Kinski’s show. As Dracula, he is constantly unpredictable, always on the edge of exploding with murderous energy upon his victims. His performance has a lot to do with small details-the way his lips part, his breathing, his tired, yet terrifying rhythm of speech-but these details coalesce into an overall impression: that this man, this thing, is positively other worldly, something beyond human. Herzog and Kinski are famous for the collaborations on projects concerning wildly obsessive, passionate human beings (Aguirre the Wrath of God, Fitzcarraldo), and his portrayal of Dracula in this film reminds us of the power of their collaboration. It truly is one of the finest meetings of actor and part the vampire genre has ever seen.

The film is also notable for its simultaneous production of both English and German-language versions. Supposedly, this was done as conciliation towards 20th Century Fox, who wanted an “International” version-realeased as Nosferatu the Vampyre to sell in America along with the original German version.

The German version is simply superior. Admittedly, the structure and look of the film is essentially identical across both versions (barring a few minor alterations of shots). However, the principal actors, particularly Ganz, are more capable performers in German than English. Adjani and Kinski are serviceable in the English version, but the whole cast seems more comfortable and emotionally expressive in Phantom der Nacht. Additionally, some scenes in the English version incorporate dubbing and voiceover work that ultimately ends up distracting and unsatisfying. There is dubbing the German version as well; according to an article on “movie-censorship.com,” some scenes were reportedly too expensive to shoot twice and Roland Topor’s voice was dubbed for the German release. Still, Phantom der Nacht’s overall sound design is altogether more seamless and believable. This was clearly conceived as a German film, and should be viewed as such.

As is the case with many of his films, Nosferatu is chocked full of memorable flourishes of Herzogian weirdness. Consider a random villager playing a violin for no reason around Dracula’s castle, or Renfield’s inexplicable joy as Dracula shoos him away after completing his mission. Consider the unusually high prevalence of cats throughout Wismar, or a brilliantly executed scene of gallows humor towards the end as a townsperson realizes he can’t arrest someone because the entire city government is dead. All of Herzog’s movies attempt to visually realize, with as much seriousness as possible, various forms of insanity. How fitting that he would make a horror film then, a genre where such insanity is not only allowed, but welcomed.

NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE - SPECIAL BENEFIT SCREENING

Friday, October 4th, 2013
Posted by Jim Healy
NOSFERATU movie poster

CINEMATHEQUE PRESS RELEASE -- FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 4, 2013

UW CINEMATHEQUE & WISCONSIN FILM FESTIVAL PRESENT BENEFIT SCREENING OF HERZOG’S “NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE”
OCTOBER 29 SCREENING AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS IS FUNDRAISER FOR BRINGING DIGITAL CINEMA TO UW-MADISON CAMPUS

In conjunction with their current series tributes to Werner Herzog and the International Horror Film, the UW Cinematheque, in partnership with the Wisconsin Film Festival, will present a benefit screening of Herzog’s 1979 chiller NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE (NOSFERATU: PHANTOM DER NACHT). The screening will take place Halloween week on Tuesday, October 29 at 7 p.m. at the Sundance Cinemas in Madison, 430 N. Midvale Blvd. The screening will serve as a benefit for the Cinematheque, which is seeking funds to install a new digital projector and server in their regular venue at 4070 Vilas Hall. These upgrades will also benefit the Wisconsin Film Festival, which annually holds its event at the Cinematheque venue.

Tickets are $20 each and can be purchased online through the Wisconsin Film Festival’s website here: https://itkt.choicecrm.net/templates/UWFF/

A remake of F.W. Murnau’s horror classic, Herzog’s NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE is itself an outstanding contribution to the vampire genre. Unavailable for big screen showings for several years, the film’s visually sumptuous quality extends to its cast, which includes Klaus Kinski as the notorious and hideous count, the beautiful Isabelle Adjani as Lucy Harker, the vampire’s prey, and acclaimed actor Bruno Ganz as Jonathan Harker. Simultaneously shot in German and English versions, NOSFERATU will be screened in a newly restored DCP of the German version, with English subtitles.

Over the last two years, the vast majority of commercial cinemas in the U.S. and around the world have made the transition from exhibiting movies on 35mm film prints to screening them via DCP (Digital Cinema Package). DCP provides a bright, clear digital image in a lightweight, compact format that is immune to the type of damage and degradation of sound and picture that a 35mm print incurs during its lifetime.

While the UW Cinematheque has remained committed to screening 35mm, most major studios and independent distributors are proceeding with plans to make movies available only on DCP in the near future. This ongoing transition applies not only to new releases, but in some cases to the catalogue holdings of these studios and distributors - holdings that represent decades of cinema history. Even archives and museums, in an effort to preserve the original elements, are now loaning film titles that have been transferred to DCP.

Changes are coming to the Cinematheque that will allow our regular audiences, and audiences for the Wisconsin Film Festival, more opportunities to discover cinema’s past, present, and future.  For this to happen, it will be necessary for our projection booth to be upgraded with a new projector and digital server in compliance with current industry standards. Our new equipment will give us the ability to alternate between film prints and DCPs.

This fundraising initiative has a target of $50,000 and over $10,000 has already been raised. Donations are currently being accepted by the Cinematheque’s Friends of Film fund at http://cinema.wisc.edu/donate.

A benefit screening of NOSFERATU: THE VAMPYRE on Tuesday October 29, 7 p.m. at:

Sundance Cinemas
430 N. Midvale Blvd.
Madison, WI 53705

Tickets: $20.

Tickets can be purchased in advance here: https://itkt.choicecrm.net/templates/UWFF/

Tickets can also be purchased night of the screening (cash only).

NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE (NOSFERATU: PHANTOM DER NACHT)
West Germany | 1979 | DCP | 107 min. | German with English subtitles
Director: Werner Herzog
Cast: Klaus Kinski, Isabelle Adjani, Bruno Ganz
Herzog’s remake of F.W. Murnau’s horror classic is itself an outstanding contribution to the vampire genre. The film’s visually sumptuous quality extends to its cast, especially Kinski as the notorious and hideous count and the beautiful Isabelle Adjani as Lucy Harker, the vampire’s prey.

For inquiries, please contact Jim Healy, jehealy@wisc.edu or 608-263-9643.

See you at the Movies!

Jim Healy, Director of Programming

Just added! Free screening of ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW

Monday, September 30th, 2013
Posted by Jim Healy

UW CINEMATHEQUE PRESENTS PRE-RELEASE SCREENING OF

“ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW”

FREE PREVIEW SCREENING ON OCTOBER 6 OF PROVOCATIVE NEW INDIE COMEDY


On Sunday, October 6 at 7 p.m., the UW Cinematheque will present a free pre-release screening of one of the most talked about films from this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Randy Moore’s satirical comedy ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW tells the story of one average American father and his eventual descent into madness during a family vacation at Walt Disney World in Florida! Filmed in black and white at actual theme park locations, ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW is a bold and ingenious trip into the happiest place on earth!


The screening will take place in our regular screening room at 4070 Vilas Hall, 821 University Avenue.


ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW will screen Sunday, October 6, 7 p.m. at:


4070 Vilas Hall

821 University Avenue

Madison, WI 53711

 

No pass necessary. Admission free. Seating limited.

Our website: http://cinema.wisc.edu

Official film website: http://escapefromtomorrow.com

 

ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW

USA | 2013 | HD Projection | 90 min.

Director: Randy Moore

Cast: Roy Abramsohn, Elena Shuber, Stass Klassen

THE PUNISHER - Mark Goldblatt in person!

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013
Posted by Jim Healy

CINEMATHEQUE PRESS RELEASE -- FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 18, 2013

UW CINEMATHEQUE WELCOMES MARK GOLDBLATT IN PERSON!
ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATED FILM EDITOR & DIRECTOR WILL PRESENT SCREENING OF THE PUNISHER

On September 20th, the UW Cinematheque will welcome noted film editor, director and UW-Madison alum Mark Goldblatt (class of 1970) to the UW Madison campus. Mr. Goldblatt’s editing credits include such contemporary action classics as THE TERMINATOR, COMMANDO, RAMBO: FIRST BLOOD PART II, STARSHIP TROOPERS, RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES, BAD BOYS 2, PEARL HARBOR and TERMINATOR 2: JUDGEMENT DAY, which earned him an Academy Award nomination in 1992. He most recently served as editor on the still-in-release PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS.

In his days at UW-Madison, Goldblatt was an instrumental programmer with the WUD Film Committee. In the late 1970s, he began his career as an editor with Roger Corman’s New World Pictures, working on such films as Ron Howard’s feature directorial debut, GRAND THEFT AUTO and Joe Dante’s PIRANHA.

In the late 1980s, Goldblatt himself turned to directing with two features for New World Pictures. His second feature, THE PUNISHER, was the first of three separate adaptations of the Marvel comic book character. It stars Dolph Lundgren in the title role. On Friday, September 20th, at 7 p.m., in 4070 Vilas Hall, Mark Goldblatt will introduce THE PUNISHER. After the screening, Goldblatt will discuss the film and his career in Hollywood.

As always, all screenings are free and open to the public. Please see below for a complete description of this special program
THE PUNISHER will screen at:

4070 Vilas Hall
821 University Ave
Madison, WI 53706

Admission free for all screenings, seating limited.

Our website: http://cinema.wisc.edu

THE PUNISHER - Mark Goldblatt in person!
USA, Australia | 1989 | 35mm | 89 min.
Director: Mark Goldblatt
Cast: Dolph Lundgren, Louis Gossett Jr., Jeroen Krabbé
In one of the big-screen’s first attempts to bring a Marvel comic book to life, Lundgren plays Frank Castle, a cop who is transformed into the vengeful title character when his family is wiped out by criminals. When The Punisher takes on the Japanese mob that’s taking over his city, his former partner (Gossett) moves in to stop the vigilante. Fun and fast-moving, director Mark Goldblatt’s second feature is told in the same hyper-violent, yet classical, style that marked the great action movies of the 1980s. It was a style that Goldblatt helped to create through his influential work as an editor on such key entries in the genre such as The Terminator, Commando and Rambo. Goldblatt, a UW Madison alum, will join us in person to discuss his film and career in Hollywood. Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.

See you at the Movies!

Jim Healy, Director of Programming

UW CINEMATHEQUE ANNOUNCES FALL 2013 PROGRAMS!

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013
Posted by Jim Healy

CINEMATHEQUE PRESS RELEASE -- FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

AUGUST 21, 2013


UW CINEMATHEQUE ANNOUNCES FALL 2013 SCREENING CALENDAR
LINEUP INCLUDES FILMS BY WERNER HERZOG, JEAN-PIERRE MELVILLE, EMILE DE ANTONIO, HOWARD HAWKS + 60TH ANNIVERSARY SALUTE TO CINEMASCOPE & EXCITING NEW PREMIERES!

Hot on the heels of our popular summer series (which wraps up August 22 & 23 with screenings of Ingmar Bergman’s Smiles of a Summer Night and Mel Brooks’ The Producers), the UW Cinematheque begins a full slate of feature film programs on August 30. The fall 2013 season concludes on Sunday, December 15.

The internationally diverse fall lineup includes series devoted to the work of four renowned directors: France’s Jean-Pierre Melville, Germany’s Werner Herzog, American documentary innovator Emile de Antonio, and legendary Hollywood auteur Howard Hawks.

Sunday Cinematheque screenings at the Chazen Museum of Art will pay tribute to the 60th anniversary of the widescreen format CinemaScope with 13 of the best features produced in the rectangular anamorphic aspect ratio.

Our continuing Premiere Showcase series will bring to Madison the first screenings of four new features that have won acclaim this year at top festivals like Sundance, SXSW, Berlin, and Cannes.
Cinematheque’s Special Presentations include new 35mm prints of canonized classics like Antonioni’s L’Avventura and Lynch’s Eraserhead, plus in-person visits from two distinguished film industry professionals (and UW, Madison alums), Mark Goldblatt and Jill Soloway (more detailed press releases on these two guests will be forthcoming).

And, in collaboration with the WUD Film Committee, we will present three more of our offbeat Marquee Mondays series at the Marquee Theater at Union South.

All Cinematheque screenings are free and open to the public. Please see below for a complete listing of programs and series descriptions. The Cinematheque’s website (http://cinema.wisc.edu) will go live with the summer calendar on Saturday, August 24.

Friday and Saturday programs screen at:

4070 Vilas Hall
821 University Ave
Madison, WI 53706

Sunday programs screen at:

Chazen Museum of Art
750 University Avenue
Madison, WI 53706

Monday and Thursday programs screen at

Marquee Theater at Union South
1308 W. Dayton Street
Madison, WI 53715

Admission free for all screenings, seating limited.

Our website: http://cinema.wisc.edu

For photos, visit: https://mywebspace.wisc.edu/xythoswfs/webview/fileManager.action?entryNa...

For additional information, contact:
Jim Healy, (608) 263-9643, jehealy@wisc.edu
Ben Reiser, (608) 262-3627, breiser@wisc.edu


SERIES AT-A-GLANCE:

JEAN-PIERRE MELVILLE: CRIME FILM MASTERWORKS
An independent within the French production system, Jean-Pierre Melville (1917-1973) has been celebrated for his minimalist dramas that explore the criminal underbelly of society. Melville’s tragic tales of cops and crooks, showgirls and gamblers have had a significant influence on a number of contemporary filmmakers, from Walter Hill to Quentin Tarantino to Johnnie To. Born Jean-Pierre Grumbach, Melville served in the French Resistance during WWII and this series will include the director’s most personal effort, the recently rediscovered Army of Shadows (1969).

INTERNATIONAL HORROR CLASSICS
Leading-up to Halloween, we will honor the horror movie season with an international assortment of creepy chillers that range from the classy to the trashy. The selection includes Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face; Masaki Kobayashi’s Kwaidan; a classic from Britain’s Hammer Studios, The Curse of the Werewolf; and a gore-drenched gem from Italy, Lucio Fulci’s The Beyond.

FOUR FROM HERZOG
In the four decades since he rose to critical prominence in the 1970s, director Werner Herzog has alternated between fiction and documentary films in search of that elusive, poetic quality he has called “ecstatic truth.” In October, we will present three of Herzog’s most celebrated 70s narrative features (Aguirre, the Wrath of God, The Enigma of Kasper Hauser and Stroszek) and an exemplary, recent non-fiction work (Encounters at the End of the World). This selection is co-presented by Cinematheque and Tales from Planet Earth, which will take place November 1-3, 2013.

HOWARD HAWKS: THE EARLY YEARS
Before he became established through his iconoclastic, emblematic work in numerous genres from the late 30s through the late 60s, Howard Hawks (1896-1977) was a journeyman director during the late silent and early sound eras, working for studios like Fox, Warner Bros., and Columbia. The work Hawks completed during this time allowed him to experiment with the sound and editing techniques and develop the themes that would be the identifying marks of his later efforts. This series includes two of Hawks’ silent features, Fig Leaves and A Girl in Every Port; pre-code goodies The Criminal Code and The Crowd Roars starring James Cagney; and Hawks’ 1932 gangland masterpiece Scarface.

EMILE DE ANTONIO: DISSENTING VOICE OF THE COLD WAR
A leading and influential political documentary filmmaker of the 1960s and 70s, Emile de Antonio’s work is marked by decidedly dissenting positions on a number of controversial social and political events. The Cinematheque’s selection of four of de Antonio’s feature-length non-fiction movies includes his examination of the Vietnam War, In the Year of the Pig; an unconventional biography of Richard Nixon, Millhouse; Underground, a clandestine look at the Weather Underground during their years in hiding; and Rush to Judgement, a close look at the Warren Commission findings that we will screen on the 50th anniversary of the JFK assassination. All of the prints shown are part of the Emile de Antonio collection at the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research.

SUNDAY CINEMATHEQUE AT THE CHAZEN: CINEMASCOPE AT 60
The Cinematheque-Chazen Museum of Art collaboration for the fall will salute the 60th anniversary of the anamorphic widescreen process that first appeared in American cinemas in 1953. The tribute includes 13 feature films in multiple genres and focuses on the great auteurs who experimented with the new rectangular format, including Douglas Sirk, John Ford, Max Ophuls, Akria Kurosawa, Nicholas Ray, and Otto Preminger. 

PREMIERE SHOWCASE
Premiere Showcase is the Cinematheque’s effort to bring the boldest and most exciting new cinema back to the big screen. Crafted with the same curat¬orial acuity we bring to our repertory series, Premiere Showcase presents exciting new work by contem¬porary directors that would otherwise have no theatrical venue in the area. This season’s lineup includes highly anticipated new features by American independent artists David Gordon Green and Joe Swanberg; Hong Kong action master Johnnie To; and Jia Zhangke, one of mainland China’s most acclaimed auteurs.

SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS
Fall 2013 special presentations include two in-person visits from accomplished cineastes and UW alums. In September, Oscar-nominated editor Mark Goldblatt will appear to present a rare showing of his second directorial outing, the first screen version of the Marvel vigilante legend, The Punisher. In November, television writer and producer Jill Soloway will present her feature debut, Afternoon Delight, which won her the Best Director prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Plus, new 35mm prints of several must-see movies, including Eraserhead, L’Avventura, Tales of Manhattan and Michael Roemer’s civil rights era independent classic Nothing But a Man.

MARQUEE MONDAYS
In collaboration with the student-run WUD Film Committee, the Cinematheque brings back our Monday evening series of fun screenings that travel down the more grungy avenues of contemporary pop cinema. This season’s offerings include a rare showing of the roller boogie time capsule Skatetown U.S.A., a double bill of bizarro discoveries from Grindhouse Releasing (An American Hippie in Israel and Gone with the Pope); Peter Cushing in the Christmas heist thriller Cash on Demand; and some bonus surprises. The screenings take place on at the Marquee Theater in Union South.

SCREENINGS AT-A-GLANCE:

Fri., 8/30, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
PREMIERE SHOWCASE
PRINCE AVALANCHE
USA | 2013 | HD Projection | 94 min.
Director: David Gordon Green
Cast: Paul Rudd, Emile Hirsch, Lance LeGault
Writer/director Green (George Washington, Pineapple Express) returns to his independent roots for this warm and witty character study, which won him Best Director at the 2013 Berlin Film Festival.  Introspective Alvin (Rudd) and his girlfriend’s sex-crazed brother (Hirsch) take on summer jobs painting yellow lines on an isolated highway in 1980s Texas; like most prospective in-laws, they can barely tolerate each other.  But after toiling together for days (and more than a few drinks), their initial bickering gives way to charming banter.  This winning remake of the Wisconsin Film Festival sellout Either Way retains the wry humanity that made the original so memorable, while adding some new surprising dimensions.

Sat., 8/31, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
JEAN-PIERRE MELVILLE
BOB LE FLAMBEUR
France | 1956 | 35mm | 102 min. | French with English subtitles
Director: Jean-Pierre Melville
Cast: Roger Duchesne, Daniel Cauchy, Isabelle Corey
This playful, romantic casino caper flick was the first in a series of stylish films noir made by French director Melville in tribute to the classic American genre of the ’40s and ’50s. Here, the primary influence is clearly Huston’s The Asphalt Jungle, as Bob, an old gambler and gangster strapped for cash, assembles a team of professional hoods to rob a well-guarded casino.

Fri., 9/6, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
SPECIAL PRESENTATION
ERASERHEAD
USA | 1978 | 35mm | 90 min.
Director: David Lynch
Cast: Jack Nance, Charlotte Stewart, Laurel Near
Lynch’s first feature is a frighteningly hilarious and surreal examination of male paranoia. Our hair-challenged hero, Henry (Jack Nance), faces a number of horrifying obstacles in meeting someone of the opposite sex, including dinner with her parents and procreating. Produced over a year-and-a-half period while Lynch was a student at the American Film Institute, Eraserhead launched the director as a major new talent admired by cinephiles and filmmakers all over the world. It stands today as a milestone in personal, independent filmmaking. A newly struck 35mm print will be shown!

Sat., 9/7, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
JEAN-PIERRE MELVILLE
LE DOULOS
France | 1962 | 35mm | 108 min. | French with English subtitles
Director: Jean-Pierre Melville
Cast: Jean-Paul Belmondo, Serge Regianni, Jean Desailly
Doulos is French gangster talk for a squealer and Belmondo plays Silien, a hood who just may be the stool pigeon responsible for a heist gone bad. Interrogated by the police and hunted by the underworld, Silien remains an enigma to the other characters and the audience until the film’s final moments. Filled with heart-stopping twists and thrills, this jazzy and enormously stylish French thriller has influenced numerous directors, including Quentin Tarantino and John Woo.

Sun., 9/8, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
CONTEMPT (LE MÉPRIS)
France/Italy | 1963 | 35mm | 103 min. | French with English subtitles
Director: Jean-Luc Godard
Cast: Brigitte Bardot, Michel Piccoli, Jack Palance
In Godard's much-adored widescreen classic about the perils of filmmaking in the era of the international co-production, a writer (Piccoli) is hired by a gauche American producer (Palance, aping Contempt's real producer Joseph E. Levine) to adapt Homer's Odyssey into a big screen epic, little realizing that his gorgeous wife (Bardot) is part of the bargain. Playing himself, Fritz Lang appears as the director of the film-within-the-film, and utters his much-quoted opinion that CinemaScope " wasn't meant for human beings. Just for snakes – and funerals."

Fri., 9/13, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
SPECIAL PRESENTATION
L’AVVENTURA
Italy | 1960 | 35mm | 145 min. | Italian with English subtitles
Director: Michelangelo Antonioni
Cast: Gabrielle Ferzetti, Monica Vittai, Lea Massari
Antonioni’s existential masterpiece displays the director's fascination with landscape, geometry, and architectural forms as a means of expressing the troubled state of Italy's post-war middle class.  In the role that made her an international superstar, Vitti stars as a woman searching for a lost friend who finds another. This complicated but riveting moral allegory ultimately ushered in the golden age of the European art film. A newly struck 35mm print will be shown!

Sat., 9/14, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
JEAN-PIERRE MELVILLE
ARMY OF SHADOWS (L’ARMÉE DES OMBRES)
France | 1969 | 35mm | 145 min. | French with English subtitles
Director: Jean-Pierre Melville
Cast: Lino Ventura, Simone Signoret, Jean-Pierre Cassel
In France during the final year of the German occupation, a group of resistance agents find their plans subverted from without and within. Melville puts aside his celebrated but emotionally distant style for this profoundly moving yet still enormously suspenseful story of men and women who must betray their own humanity for the sake of their struggle. The fine cast includes cinema luminary Signoret in one of her greatest performances. Somehow, Melville’s masterpiece went undistributed in this country until 2006, when the New York Times critic Manohla Dargis proclaimed it the best film of the year!

Sun., 9/15, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
RIVER OF NO RETURN
USA | 1954 | 35mm | 91 min.
Director: Otto Preminger
Cast: Robert Mitchum, Marilyn Monroe, Rory Calhoun
In this rugged outdoor adventure/love story, Monroe is a saloon singer searching for her missing husband with the help of barrel-chested Mitchum. Their perilous journey on a river raft takes great advantage of a then-new widescreen frame. “One of the first films to discover the potential of CinemaScope and a fine example of Preminger's rational approach to the mysteries of personal morality.” (Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader)

Fri., 9/20, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
SPECIAL PRESENTATION - MARK GOLDBLATT IN PERSON!
THE PUNISHER
Austraila, USA | 1989 | 35mm | 89 min.
Director: Mark Goldblatt
Cast: Dolph Lundgren, Louis Gossett Jr., Jeroen Krabbé
In one of the big-screen’s first attempts to bring a Marvel comic book to life, Lundgren plays Frank Castle, a cop who is transformed into the vengeful title character when his family is wiped out by criminals. When The Punisher takes on the Japanese mob that’s taking over his city, his former partner (Gossett) moves in to stop the vigilante. Fun and fast-moving, director Mark Goldblatt’s second feature is told in the same hyper-violent, yet classical, style that marked the great action movies of the 1980s. It was a style that Goldblatt helped to create through his influential work as an editor on such key entries in the genre such as The Terminator, Commando and Rambo. Goldblatt, a UW Madison alum, will join us in person to discuss his film and career in Hollywood. Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.

Sat., 9/21, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
JEAN-PIERRE MELVILLE
LE CERCLE ROUGE
France | 1970 | 35mm | 140 min. | French with English subtitles
Director: Jean-Pierre Melville
Cast: Alain Delon, Yves Montand, Gian Maria Volontè
In another classic Melville gangster saga, Delon, Volontè, and Montand play a criminal trio masterminding a jewel heist. Austerely stylish, Melville’s wonderfully tense and philosophical film provides a great showcase for three of European cinema’s finest performers.

Sun., 9/22, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
THE GIRL CAN’T HELP IT
USA | 1956 | 35mm | 99 min.
Director: Frank Tashlin
Cast: Jayne Mansfield, Tom Ewell, Edmond O’Brien
The eye-popping Mansfield is a stay-at-home kind of girl who finds herself pushed to become a pop singer by thuggish boyfriend O’Brien. Director Tashlin’s splashy, cartoony style reached its apex with this zany satire of fifties mores, culture, and music that features dynamic performances by Little Richard, Abbey Lincoln, Fats Domino, the Platters, Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran, and many others.

Mon., 9/23, 7 p.m. - Marquee Theater
MARQUEE MONDAYS
SKATETOWN U.S.A.
USA | 1979 | 35mm | 98 min.
Director: William A. Levey
Cast: Scott Baio, Flip Wilson, Patrick Swayze
In this loosely-plotted and structured multi-character comedy/time capsule, the denizens and proprietors of a Los Angeles disco and skating rink gather for a roller boogie contest (first prize: $1,000 and a moped!). In addition to Swayze making his feature debut, the cast of this campy treat includes several veterans of 60s and 70s television, including Happy Days’ Baio, Laugh-In’s Wilson and Ruth Buzzi, The Brady Bunch’s Maureen McCormick, and Welcome Back Kotter’s Ron Palillo. The soundtrack is peppered with disco era hits, none of which were licensed for home video release, so don’t look for this one on DVD or blu-ray.

Fri., 9/27, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
PREMIERE SHOWCASE
DRUG WAR (DU ZHAN)
China | 2012 | HD Projection | 107 min. | Mandarin & Cantonese with English subtitles
Director: Johnnie To
Cast: Louis Koo, Honglei Sun, Yi Huang
A drug lord sells out his cronies in Hong Kong action master Johnnie To’s first crime film shot in Mainland China.  As a team of cops closes in on the meth syndicate, a riveting web of doublings and double-crossings unfurls, climaxing in a series of epic gun battles.  “Exhilarating – The French Connection meets The Wire!” – Screen

Sat., 9/28, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
JEAN-PIERRE MELVILLE
UN FLIC
France | 1972 | 35mm | 98 min. | French with English subtitles
Director: Jean-Pierre Melville
Cast: Alain Delon, Catherine Deneuve, Richard Crenna
Delon stars as a detective hunting down a gang of bank robbers led by a nightclub owning acquaintance (played by Rambo mentor Crenna).  Tension mounts as the men circle each other and the woman they both love, showgirl Deneuve.  Melville’s final film is as cool and taut as ever, bookended by two extended heist sequences that rank among the best of his career.

Sun., 9/29, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
FANTASTIC VOYAGE
USA | 1966 | 35mm | 100 min.
Director: Richard Fleischer
Cast: Stephen Boyd, Raquel Welch, Donald Pleasence
In this sci-fi classic, a group of medical specialists are miniaturized and injected into the body of an important scientist, in order to remove a blood clot. Their journey is fraught with peril as they struggle through whirlpools of blood, bronchial vacuums, and seaweed-like lymph node fibers, and deal with an enemy agent who is hiding in their midst. Director Fleischer was a pioneering master of the widescreen frame and he makes great use of it here as a showcase for the Oscar-winning special effects and set design.

Thurs., 10/3, 7 p.m. - Marquee Theater
PREMIERE SHOWCASE
DRINKING BUDDIES
USA | 2013 | HD Projection | 90 min.
Director: Joe Swanberg
Cast: Olivia Wilde, Anna Kendrick, Jake Johnson
Influential independent writer/director Swanberg (Silver Bullets, All the Light in the Sky) returns with a cheerfully upbeat romantic comedy shot by cinematographer Ben Richardson (Beasts of the Southern Wild). Colleagues at a Chicago microbrewery, Kate (Wilde) and Luke (Johnson) keep their relationship strictly platonic, even when there’s a lot of drinking on the job. But when Kate splits from boyfriend Chris (Office Space and The Conjuring’s Ron Livingston) and Luke spends some time apart from girlfriend Jill (Kendrick), things start to get complicated. Working with a cast of some of today’s best-known and most talented film actors (which also includes Jason Sudeikis and director Ti West), Swanberg has crafted a fun and bubbly treat.

Fri., 10/4, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
INTERNATIONAL HORROR
KWAIDAN (KAIDAN)
Japan | 1965 | 35mm | 161 min. | Japanese with English subtitles
Director: Masaki Kobayashi
Cast: Michiyo Aratama, Misako Watanabe, Tatsuya Nakadai
Using stunning color and a widescreen canvas, Kobayashi’s masterwork consists of four nightmarish tales in which terror thrives and demons lurk. Adapted from traditional Japanese ghost stories, the lavish production drew extensively on Kobayashi’s own training as an artist.

Sat., 10/5, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
WERNER HERZOG
AGUIRRE, THE WRATH OF GOD (AGUIRRE, DER ZORN GOTTES)
West Germany | 1972 | 35mm | 100 min. | German with English subtitles
Director: Werner Herzog
Cast: Klaus Kinski, Helena Rojo, Ray Guerra
In 1560, mad Spanish conquistador Aguirre (Kinski in one of his most demented performances) leads a mutiny during an expedition down the Amazon to find the legendary “golden city” of El Dorado. When Aguirre takes over, the journey downriver becomes increasingly deadly. Like his main character, director Herzog took his cast and crew to previously unexplored regions of South America to make his masterful epic adventure.

Sun., 10/6, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
THE MAN WHO NEVER WAS
UK | 1956 | 35mm | 103 min.
Director: Ronald Neame
Cast: Clifton Webb, Gloria Grahame, Stephen Boyd
In a suspense-filled cat-and-mouse spy story, Webb stars as a British intelligence officer who orchestrates a complex plot to mislead the German forces prior to the invasion of Sicily during WWII. English journeyman director Neame, a former cinematographer, displays a great talent and aptitude for widescreen compositions in this entertaining and underrated thriller.

Fri., 10/11, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
INTERNATIONAL HORROR
EYES WITHOUT A FACE (LES YEUX SANS VISAGE)
France | 1960 | 35mm | 90 min. | French with English subtitles
Director: Georges Franju
Cast: Pierre Brasseur, Alida Valli, Edith Scob
A decidedly unbalanced surgeon kidnaps a series of young women, attempting to graft their skin onto his daughter’s disfigured face. This poetic, dread-filled classic--both subtle and deeply shocking--is a high water mark in both the horror and the European art film genres. It later provided the primary inspiration for Pedro Almodóvar’s The Skin I Live In.

Sat., 10/12, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
WERNER HERZOG
THE ENIGMA OF KASPER HAUSER (JEDER FÜR SICH UND GOTT GEGEN ALLE )
West Germany | 1974 | 35mm | 110 min. | German with English subtitles
Director: Werner Herzog
Cast: Bruno S., Walter Ladengast, Brigitte Mira
In 1928, Kasper Hauser mysteriously appears in the town of Nürnberg, Germany. It soon becomes clear to the townspeople that Kasper (played by Bruno S.) has been locked in a cell for most of his life, never having contact with any other person. After learning to communicate, Kasper develops a cynical personal philosophy about the world he has entered and rebels against those who wish to exploit him (the original German title, literally translated, is Every Man for Himself and God Against All). Thoughtful, compelling, and furnished with just enough period detail, Herzog’s matter-of-fact approach brings an amazing true story to life.

Sun., 10/13, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
LOLA MONTÈS
France, Germany | 1955 | 35mm | 115 min. | French with English subtitles
Director: Max Ophuls
Cast: Martine Carol, Peter Ustinov, Oskar Werner
Carol stars as the legendary Spanish courtesan and adventuress whose lovers included Franz Liszt and King Ludwig of Bavaria. Lola’s life and loves are recalled by the circus ringmaster (Ustinov) who has made this beguiling beauty his central attraction. The final film from master stylist Ophüls features his trademarked long-takes and steadily moving camera, as well as a sharp and relevant critique on the culture of celebrity. This stunning new edition of Lola Montès restores the film’s original stereo soundtrack and brings Ophüls remarkable widescreen color scheme back to life. “Back in 1962, I hailed Lola Montès as the greatest film of all time, and I stand by that judgment.” (Andrew Sarris, The Village Voice).

Fri., 10/18, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
INTERNATIONAL HORROR
THE CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF
UK | 1961 | 35mm | 91 min.
Director: Terence Fisher
Cast: Oliver Reed, Clifford Evans, Yvonne Romain
Spain in the 1700s provides the backdrop for one of Hammer Films’ finest productions and one of the most memorable of all big screen lycanthrope stories. The bastard son (Reed) of a deaf-mute servant girl begins to understand that he is responsible for several murders that occur when the moon is full. As he did for Hammer with the Dracula and Frankenstein stories, director Fisher reveals his enormous talent for updating classic movie monster myths in vivid color.

Sat., 10/19, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
WERNER HERZOG
STROSZEK
West Germany | 1977 | HD Projection | 108 min. | German with English subtitles
Director: Werner Herzog
Cast: Bruno S., Eva Mattes, Clemens Scheitz
This bitter, sharply tragicomic look at American society follows ex-convict Stroszek (played by Herzog favorite Bruno S.) as he leaves his life as a Berlin street musician to pursue the American dream in a desolate Wisconsin town. Herzog’s unique masterpiece is an unrelenting and impressionistic rendering of contemporary Germany and the U.S.

Sun., 10/20, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
THE LONG GRAY LINE
USA | 1955 | 35mm | 138 min.
Director: John Ford
Cast: Tyrone Power, Maureen O’Hara, Ward Bond
Ford’s study of a decidedly minor historical figure - beloved West Point instructor Marty Maher (Power) - is nonetheless one of the director’s major efforts, and his first in CinemaScope. “Rich with nostalgia, family feeling, and sentimentality. It’s given density by...a kind of mysticism that, as in How Green Was My Valley, makes the past seem more alive than the present.” (Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader)

Mon., 10/21, 7 p.m. - Marquee Theater
MARQUEE MONDAYS
GONE WITH THE POPE
USA | 2010 | 35mm | 84 min.
Director: Duke Mitchell
Cast: Duke Mitchell, Lorenzo Dardaro, Jim LoBianco
Paul (writer and director Mitchell) is a sleazy small-time gangster who comes up with a particularly unholy scheme: kidnap the pope and demand a “dollar from every catholic in the world” as ransom. A former nightclub entertainer who was, along with Sammy Petrillo, one half of the most popular Martin and Lewis knockoff act, Mitchell turned to independent, low-budget filmmaking in the 1970s with the ultra violent Massacre Mafia Style (1974). At the time of Mitchell’s death in 1981, his second feature, then titled Kiss the Ring, existed only in an unassembled form. Oscar-winning editor Bob Murawski (The Hurt Locker, Spider Man) has taken on an enormous labor of love by creating a finished film from Mitchell’s inspiring, exciting, and often hilarious footage. The result is a genuine revelation: one of the most imaginative and fast-paced exploitation efforts of our times. Murawski’s work on Gone with the Pope extended over 15 years and brought Mitchell’s decidedly personal and fascinating work back from the brink of cinematic oblivion.

Mon., 10/21, 8:30 p.m. - Marquee Theater
MARQUEE MONDAYS
AN AMERICAN HIPPIE IN ISRAEL (HA-TREMPIST)
Israel | 1972 | 35mm | 95 min. | Hebrew with English subtitles
Director: Amos Sefer
Cast: Ahser Tzarfati, Shmuel Wolf, Lily Avidan
Visiting Israel, “American hippie” Mike (played by Israeli actor Tzarfati) thumbs a ride with a groovy chick and they set off with some other free-spirit friends in search of a desert island Utopia. A few days of paradise give way to debauchery for the anti-war bunch as nature takes its heavy toll. This amazing, recently rediscovered far-out oddity also contains man-eating sharks, some creepy mimes, and robots!

Fri., 10/25, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
INTERNATIONAL HORROR
THE BEYOND (...E TU VIVRAI NEL TERRORE L’ALDILÀ)
Italy | 1981 | 35mm | 87 min.
Director: Lucio Fulci
Cast: Catriona MacColl, David Warbeck, Cinzia Monreale
A remote hotel violently sucks the souls out of any guests who happen to check in. This persistent failure in customer service just might have something to do with the fact that the building has been constructed right over one of the seven doorways to hell! With a particularly effective use of color, Fulci’s operatically gory Italian haunted house/zombie movie represents the apotheosis of the director’s horror oeuvre.

Sat., 10/26, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
WERNER HERZOG
ENCOUNTERS AT THE END OF THE WORLD
USA | 2007 | HD Projection | 99 min. |
Director: Werner Herzog
Filmmaker and adventurer Herzog takes his camera to perhaps the most remote part of the planet – Antarctica. Joining the community at the McMurdo Station at the South Pole, Herzog photographs forbidden locations such as the under-ice depths of the Ross Sea to the brink of the Mount Erebus volcano. A perfectly witty and sardonic travel guide, Herzog’s marvelous narration is surpassed by his stunning images of a practically science-fiction landscape; images that demand to be seen on a big screen.

Sun., 10/27, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
THE INNOCENTS
UK | 1961 | 35mm | 100 min.
Director: Jack Clayton
Cast: Deborah Kerr, Michael Redgrave, Martin Stephens
Kerr plays a first time governess dealing with two precocious children and a possibly haunted house in Clayton's screen version of Henry James' The Turn of the Screw. Is it all in her mind or is she in over her head? The Innocents features indelibly intense performances by Kerr and Stephens (as the young Miles) that will have you questioning what you've seen long past the end credits. Freddie Francis' remarkably evocative black and white CinemaScope cinematography is in constant, fluid motion, and William Archibald and Truman Capote's screenplay brings more than just a taste of Southern Gothic to the proceedings. In the genre of psychological horror, The Innocents evokes memories of all that came before it and paves the way for all that has come since, from Dead of Night and The Uninvited to The Shining and The Others.

Fri., 11/1, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
SPECIAL PRESENTATION
TALES OF MANHATTAN
USA | 1942 | 35mm | 118 min.
Director: Julien Duvivier
Cast: Rita Hayworth | Henry Fonda | Edward G. Robinson
An unlucky tailcoat, which brings a curse upon anyone who wears it, serves as the linking device for this absolutely delightful collection of short episodes featuring a jaw-dropping cast of 40s movie superstars. The amazing roster of performers also includes Charles Laughton, Ginger Rogers, Charles Boyer, Paul Robeson, and George Sanders. Bonus: A look at an episode excised from the original release version starring W.C. Fields!

Fri., 11/8, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
EMILE DE ANTONIO
IN THE YEAR OF THE PIG
USA | 1969 | 35mm | 101 min.
Director: Emile de Antonio
Documentary innovator de Antonio’s look at the Vietnam war shows us what was happening at the height of the conflict (1968/69) through news footage and interviews. The filmmaker makes a compelling argument that “America is intervening in a civil war on behalf of a corrupt, authoritarian South Vietnamese government and carrying on a war founded on racism” (Danny Peary, Guide for the Film Fanatic).

Sat., 11/9, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
EARLY HAWKS
THE CROWD ROARS
USA | 1932 | 35mm | 70 min.
Director: Howard Hawks
Cast: James Cagney, Joan Blondell, Ann Dvorak
“He’s a speed mad race driver who laughs at death…she’s the girlfriend who packs dynamite in her kisses and TNT in her slaps! If they don’t make your heart pound with excitement, you’re not human!” (Let’s all pause here for a moment to mourn the lost art of film tagline writing.)  Cagney and Eric Linden star in this blazing tale of rival racecar drivers, with Blondell and Dvorak as the women who love them (sometimes both at once). Writer/director Hawks was a racer himself before going Hollywood, and deeply familiar with the dangers of the sport - his stylishly choreographed, edge-of-your-seat race scenes are littered with spectacular crashes and fiery explosions.

Sun., 11/10, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
THE TRUE STORY OF JESSE JAMES
USA | 1957 | 35mm | 92 min.
Director: Nicholas Ray
Cast: Robert Wagner, Jeffrey Hunter, Hope Lange
Wagner and Hunter are the James brothers, Jesse and Frank, in this fascinating re-telling of the outlaws’ legend, updated for 1950s’ audiences. The widescreen western follows in the tradition of director (and Wisconsin native) Ray’s other portraits of young iconoclasts, like Rebel Without a Cause and They Live By Night. Ray’s work (with the WPA and Alan Lomax) in researching the history of American folk music has its greatest resonance in his film work here.

Thurs., 11/14, 7 p.m. - Marquee Theater
SPECIAL PRESENTATION - JILL SOLOWAY IN PERSON
AFTERNOON DELIGHT
USA | 2013 | HD Projection | 99 min.
Director: Jill Soloway
Cast: Kathryn Hahn, Juno Temple, Josh Radnor
After a chance meeting, bored and affluent wife and mother Rachel (Hahn) finds herself irresistibly drawn into the messy personal life of young stripper McKenna (Temple). When Rachel invites McKenna to move into her home, it unleashes a series of dramatic changes in Rachel’s life. With sharp observations on class and women’s roles in contemporary Los Angeles, the frequently funny, and wonderfully performed Afternoon Delight is the first feature film from Jill Soloway, a veteran television scribe and producer (Six Feet Under, The United States of Tara) and UW Madison alum. Soloway will join us in person to discuss her film, which won her the Best Director prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

Fri., 11/15, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
EMILE DE ANTONIO
MILLHOUSE: A WHITE COMEDY
USA | 1971 | 35mm | 92 min.
Director: Emile de Antonio
This mesmerizingly haunting journey through Richard Nixon's political career starts with his 1946 House of Representatives win and ends with his ascension to the Presidency in 1968. The story includes all of the setbacks, scandals, gaffes and intrigue that came in between: the trial of Alger Hiss; the Checkers speech; Nixon’s loss in the California Governor's race, et al. Millhouse features a mountain of archival footage and interviews, but no voice-over narration. These are the Nixon years defined and unrefined.

Fri., 11/15, 8:45 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
EMILE DE ANTONIO
UNDERGROUND
USA | 1976 | 16mm | 87 min.
Director: Emile de Antonio
In his most overtly subversive work, de Antonio and his cameraman, Haskell Wexler, interview several fugitive members of the Weather Underground. The subjects, including Bernardine Dohrn and Bill Ayers, are filmed obliquely as they discuss how they came to be radicalized and the violent actions that eventually sent them into hiding.

Sat., 11/16, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
EARLY HAWKS
THE CRIMINAL CODE
USA | 1931 | 35mm | 95 min.
Director: Howard Hawks
Cast: Walter Huston, Phillips Holmes, Boris Karloff
Huston is former D.A. Mark Brady, who finds himself warden of the prison where most of the men he prosecuted have been locked up. Brady takes pity on one young prisoner (Holmes) and recruits him as a servant. When the convict witnesses a brutal prison killing, he finds his loyalties torn between his benefactor and his fellow inmates. After more than 80 years, this pre-code prison drama still thrills!

Sun., 11/17, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
THE TARNISHED ANGELS
USA | 1958 | 35mm | 91 min.
Director: Douglas Sirk
Cast: Rock Hudson, Robert Stack, Dorothy Malone
The three principal cast members and director of Written on the Wind are reunited for a black and white CinemaScope classic. Hudson plays a New Orleans reporter who finds himself drawn to a down-and-out World War I veteran and air circus flyer (Stack) and his charming wife (Malone), with tragic consequences.  Based on William Faulkner’s novel, Pylon, this depression-set period piece is the most fatalistically glamorous of Sirk’s films.

Fri., 11/22, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
EMILE DE ANTONIO
RUSH TO JUDGMENT
USA | 1967 | 35mm | 98 min.
Director: Emile de Antonio
On the 50th anniversary of JFK’s assassination, we go down the rabbit hole with the mother of all conspiracy theories in this film version of Mark Lane's muckraking book. Lane, a lawyer, serves as host, conducting a series of interviews with eyewitnesses to the assassination and the events that followed. Aimed at pointing out flaws and poking holes in the Warren Commission's report, the film is an indelible document of the mystery, paranoia, and grief that swept the country in the months and years that followed the tragedy. Even if one is not prone to believe in cover ups and vast conspiracies, Rush to Judgment is a fascinating exploration of the nature of eyewitness accounts and a clear eyed time capsule of one of the darkest moments in American history.

Sat., 11/23, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
EARLY HAWKS
SCARFACE
USA | 1932 | 35mm | 93 min.
Director: Howard Hawks
Cast: Paul Muni, Ann Dvorak, George Raft
Tony (Muni) is a thug who finds that the more vicious he is, the more he thrives in the big city underworld. But his not-entirely-appropriate feelings for his sister (Dvorak) will be his undoing. Along with The Public Enemy and Little Caesar, Hawks’ masterpiece set the template for 80 years of gangster pictures, including Brian De Palma’s remake of Scarface.

Sun. 11/24, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
THE HIDDEN FORTRESS
Japan | 1958 | 35mm | 139 min. | Japanese with English subtitles
Director: Akira Kurosawa
Cast: Toshiro Mifune, Misa Uehara, Takashi Shimura
In a story filmed in black and white anamorphic Tohoscope, two cowardly soldiers are enlisted by a feudal Japanese general (Mifune) to help him guard both a wagonload of gold and a deposed princess on the run for her life. Kurosawa’s swashbuckling samurai adventure yarn, itself influenced by tales from many different cultures, was one of George Lucas’ primary inspirations for Star Wars.

Fri., 12/6, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
SPECIAL PRESENTATION
NOTHING BUT A MAN
USA | 1964 | 35mm | 92 min.
Director: Michael Roemer
Cast: Ivan Dixon, Abbey Lincoln, Yaphet Kotto
This moving, landmark independent drama and love story focuses on the struggles of a young working-class black man from the south. Duff Anderson (Dixon) is determined to live up to his responsibilities as a husband, father, and worker, despite being persistently faced with the racial and class bigotry of others. When he falls in love with the middle-class minister’s daughter Josie (Lincoln), not all of Duff’s problems are solved. “Nothing But a Man is remarkable for not employing the easy liberal pieties of its period in an attempt to reassure white audiences that all stories have happy endings.” (Roger Ebert)

Sat., 12/7, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
EARLY HAWKS
FIG LEAVES
USA | 1926 | 35mm | 70 min.
Director: Howard Hawks
Cast: George O’Brien, Olive Borden, Phyllis Haver
Set alternately in 1926 and a prehistoric era that surely influenced The Flintstones, this battle of the sexes comedy tells of two hard-working Adams (O’Brien) and the tough time they have in trying to please their ladies Eve (Borden). One of Hawks’ best silent movies, Fig Leaves offers an early illustration of the director’s personal code of conduct between men and women, one of the most fascinating and oft-discussed aspects of his entire career. Print courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art collection. Live piano by David Drazin.

Sat., 12/7, 8:30 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
EARLY HAWKS
A GIRL IN EVERY PORT
USA | 1928 | 35mm | 76 min.
Director: Howard Hawks
Cast: Victor McLaglen, Robert Armstrong, Louise Brooks
Two sailor buddies (McLaglen and King Kong’s Armstrong) travel around the world getting into several barroom brawls and falling in love with a number of exotic beauties. The tantalizing Brooks appears in a revealing leotard as a high-diving circus artist who seduces each of the swabbies and starts a feud between them. The code of men further explored by director Hawks in films such as Only Angels Have Wings and Rio Bravo, has its origins in this terrific fast-paced comedy. Print courtesy of George Eastman House. Live piano by David Drazin.

Sun. 12/8, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
EAST OF EDEN
USA | 1955 | 35mm | 115 min.
Director: Elia Kazan
Cast: James Dean, Julie Harris, Jo Van Fleet
In the first of his three starring roles Dean plays Cal Trask, a young man engaged in a bitter rivalry with his brother over the love of their father. Kazan’s adaptation of John Steinbeck’s acclaimed novel is a powerful and moving film that is not soon forgotten. The marvelous CinemaScope framing makes the most of the Northern California locations. Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive. 

Mon., 12/10, 7 p.m. - Marquee Theater
MARQUEE MONDAYS
CASH ON DEMAND
UK | 1962 | 35mm | 84 min.
Director: Quentin Lawrence
Cast: Peter Cushing, André Morell, Richard Vernon
A humorless taskmaster of a bank manager (Cushing) finds himself the hostage of a charming but brutal criminal (Morell). The thief plans to rob the bank while using the staff’s resentment towards their boss to his advantage. An offbeat departure for the usually horror-centric Hammer Films, this clever and riveting heist thriller is also one of the big-screen’s most unusual variations on Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. It provides a marvelous showcase for Cushing, who would have turned 100 this year.

Fri., 12/13, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
PREMIERE SHOWCASE
A TOUCH OF SIN (TIAN ZHU DING)
China | 2013 | HD Projection | 133 min. | Mandarin with English subtitles
Director: Jia Zhangke
Cast: Wu Jiang, Vivien Li, Lanshan Luo
Like Wong Kar Wai with The Grandmaster, A Touch of Sin sees modern master Jia Zhangke (The World, Still Life) boldly applying his arthouse aesthetic to the violent wuxia genre.  Following four threads spread across China’s vast geography and economy, this potent critique of contemporary China was one of the most universally acclaimed films of the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.  The title is a riff on King Hu’s wuxia classic A Touch of Zen, screened at the 2013 Wisconsin Film Festival.

Sat., 12/14, 7 p.m. – 4070 Vilas Hall
SPECIAL PRESENTATION
COMMUNICATION ARTS SHOWCASE
Highlighting works produced in Communication Arts Media Production courses at UW Madison, this program is curated by the instructors of film, video and animation courses and gives new filmmakers the opportunity to present their films on screen for the first time.

Sun., 12/15, 2 p.m. - Chazen
CINEMASCOPE AT 60
TRAPEZE
USA | 1956 | 35mm | 105 min.
Director: Carol Reed
Cast: Burt Lancaster, Tony Curtis, Gina Lollobrigida
A maimed trapeze artist (Lancaster) in a traveling European circus trains a young protégée (Curtis) to learn the triple somersault. Tensions mount when both men compete for the affections of a third aerial performer (Lollobrigida). Trapeze, presented in honor of Lancaster’s centennial, reveals not only the actor and former circus acrobat’s intense charisma, but also his remarkable physical agility. As he flies from one edge of the widescreen frame to the other without a stunt double, he is a wonder to behold!

See you at the Movies!

Jim Healy, Director of Programming

UW Cinematheque Announces Spring 2013 Screenings

Monday, December 17th, 2012
Posted by Jim Healy

UW CINEMATHEQUE ANNOUNCES SPRING 2013 SCREENING CALENDAR

LINEUP INCLUDES ANIMATIONS FROM STUDIO GHIBLI, SPAGHETTI WESTERNS, PRESTON STURGES,

JOHN FORD, SHIRLEY CLARKE, PETER WATKINS, CLAUDE SAUTET, JEAN RENOIR AND MUCH, MUCH MORE

 

After a jam-packed fall calendar that included great anti-westerns of the 60s and 70s, the marvelous Japanese action epics of Kenji Misumi, golden age Hollywood gems written by Preston Sturges, a visit from director Tim Hunter, two full-house pre-release screenings of the acclaimed new movie Silver Linings Playbook and so much more, the UW Cinematheque is proud to announce a January-May calendar that promises even more. On offer are a retrospective of anime features from Japan’s Studio Ghibli, a series of great Spaghetti Westerns, more Preston Sturges and a number of other series and special presentations that take viewers from the silent era to area premieres of some of the contemporary cinema’s most talked-about recent releases.

 

Filmed on locations in Spain and originally released internationally in 1964, Italian director Sergio Leone’s Fistful of Dollars proved to be one of the most successful and influential films of the decade. Not only did it make a star of Clint Eastwood around the world, it began a 15-year cycle of dozens of European Westerns that forever altered the Western as we knew it with more explicit and explosive violence and aggressively political storylines. This spring, the UW Cinematheque will present an extensive series of these wonderful “Spaghetti Westerns” shown on 35mm prints in their English-language release versions. While the series allows for two Leone classics, it also provides an opportunity to discover the brilliant and personal work of “the other Sergios,” namely Sergio Corbucci and Sergio Sollima, and a host of other Italian directors who flourished in this fascinating sub-genre. The series will be extended to also include screenings of Spaghetti Westerns in the 2013 Wisconsin Film Festival.

Equally eye-opening is our even more extensive series of exquisite Japanese animated features produced by Studio Ghibli that will be presented as our spring Sunday Cinematheque at the Chazen selections. As if that were not enough, our January-May calendar includes retrospective screenings devoted to such diverse talents as America’s Shirley Clarke, John Ford and Preston Sturges, Italy’s Vittorio De Sica, France’s Jacques Rivette, Claude Sautet and Jean Renoir, England’s Peter Watkins; our annual selection of films sponsored by the University’s Department of Latin American, Caribbean and Iberian Studies, including the first area showing of Miguel Gomes much-celebrated new film Tabu; and the first area screenings of new films by such talented contemporary filmmakers as David Cronenberg and Julia Loktev.

As always, all of our Cinematheque screenings are free and open to the public, whether in our regular venue at 4070 Vilas Hall or at the Chazen Museum of Art or at the Marquee Theater at Union South. The Cinematheque’s website (http://cinema.wisc.edu) will go live with the spring calendar at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, December 17, 2012.

Friday and Saturday programs screen at:


4070 Vilas Hall
821 University Ave
Madison, WI 53706

 

Thursday evening and Sunday afternoon programs screen at:

 

Chazen Museum of Art

750 University Avenue

Madison, WI 53706

 

‘Marquee Monday’ programs screen at:

 

Marquee Theater at Union South

1308 W. Dayton Street

Madison, WI 53715


Admission free for all screenings, seating limited.

 

Our website: http://cinema.wisc.edu


For additional information, contact: info@cinema.wisc.edu

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